Rejiquar Works rejiquar.com::atom 2014-04-24T00:57:51-05:00 copyright 2014 Sylvus Tarn Sylvus Tarn 2014-04-23T00:00:00-05:00 Vonda McIntyre's Little Faces 23apr2014

And here's part II of the long-lost six-years-old heart-shaped tut...which I actually only finished writing 13apr14:) (Man, I'm like two weeks ahead on these blog posts, an all time record. Too tired/frustrated/slightly ill to actually make art...)

I like Mandolin's writing on Amp's blog, but her sf&f (admittedly only one short story comes to mind) didn't do much for me—not to say the story wasn't well-written or that it didn't follow through to its logical conclusion, just that I like this old-fashioned stuff except with feminist ideals, and the two often don't play nicely together. In fact I find links to online sf all the time, not just Mandolin's recces, but others as well; and usually the taste the present doesn't get me to, as they exhort, ‘keep reading’.

But Vonda McIntyre, along with Joan Vinge, were my go-to authors back in the 80s: both wrote wonderful stories, with sfnal settings, interesting science, and great feminist characters, McIntyre in particular: her Dreamsnake is very sex-positive. Leaving aside ST adaptations and the like, her last novel (that I've read) was the equally splendid Sun and the Moon, an alternate history sf novel set in the court of the Sun King. It has period science, some interesting conundrums, fabulous historical detail and romance. (Dreamsnake also has romance, cool genetics, a vivid setting, and sympathy for characters not typically tall or pretty. Plus fancy patterned horses, which always gets my attention:)

Plus, I was pretty impressed with the aliens in “To Bell the Cat”, what with their sessile and mobile parts (only problem is, Joan Vinge, not Vonda McIntyre wrote that, but my mistaken memory still contributed) so I figured what the heck, and clicked. —And was duly impressed. Written—or at least published—in 2005, the images of the sentient, partnered spaceships reminded me of Octavia Butler's Imago trilogy; and like the commenter to Mandolin's post the alien biology, obviously based upon anglerfish also reminded me of Tiptree sans the horror.

Or, if you'd rather fight your way through the second part of this overly involved french beaded tutorial, well, be my guest:)

2014-04-13T21:49:39-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-23:/HowtoFrenchBead/2008leaf_pattern2
2014-04-22T00:00:00-05:00 Heart shaped leaf pattern. I started this page, complete with intro, just about a month shy of six years ago. It's nice to finally get it posted. 22apr2014

Heart shaped leaf pattern. I started this page, complete with intro, just about a month shy of six years ago. It's nice to finally get it posted.

2014-04-13T20:48:53-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-22:/HowtoFrenchBead/2008leaf_pattern
2014-04-21T00:00:00-05:00 Today's post has only been sitting in the queue a year and a half---hardly late at all! And with this flower, I have posted all the finished french-beaded flower posts, so far as I know, with an index page coming up =tomorrow.= Thursday. We get a leaf tut inbetween:) Enjoy. 21apr2014

Today's post has only been sitting in the queue a year and a half—hardly late at all!

And with this flower, I have posted all the finished french-beaded flower posts, so far as I know, with an index page coming up tomorrow. Thursday. We get a leaf tut inbetween:)

Enjoy.

2014-04-21T09:33:39-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-21:/Wirewrap/2012blue_french_bead_redux
2014-04-18T00:00:00-05:00 Laura Wittenberg tackles racist urban legends about black naming conventions. 18apr2014

Today's bead is not so much a fugly as a failure, as I explain in the post which collects all the pages tagged 2013 together—this allowed me to move last year's beads off the main glassbead page. Unfortunately the site doesn't allow ‘and’ tagging (i.e. 2013 and glassbeads) so there's lot of gardening stuff mixed in. Yes, I could make 2013glassbead tags, but besides cluttering up the tags page it seems to me to defeat the purpose of tagging. Someday, the wizard will write code that allows more specific tagging...in the meantime, the site is slightly broken (such imperfection is sort of a given, at least for active websites.)

For that matter, society is broken. Anything human is.

But while I was trying to find more about the heartbleed bug, I clicked on Randall Monroe's blog and discovered a fascinating series of posts about naming conventions; and what they say about race in the US. The author, who trawls baby naming to extract info about trends (in much the same way languagelog trawls the internet for data), unearthed the latest in a long line of racist stories about AAVE-style names.

My father had his own twist on these stories, which I think illustrates both his discomfort with, yet inability to escape, racism. In his version, a white (male) doctor, disgusted by a single black mother, gives the child a sexual obscenity as a surname, which (as usual) the new mom is too illiterate or stupid to understand. Eighteen or twenty odd years later, the child, now grown up and successfully attending school at a local college, has embraced the highly insulting surname instead of legally changing it. My father was the sort that spouted Charles Murrayesque crap such as ‘Asians are smartest, then whites, then blacks’ and he took great pleasure in using the word ‘nigra’ (despite having been born in, and lived all his life, in the upper midwest) which was plainly his effort to gloss a veneer over the common slur.

At the same time, he genuinely befriended black people and chose to live in a mixed race neighborhood (deliberately) long before such things were trendy. This story stuck with me for many many years: I liked the idea of the defiant and proud woman claiming a name, but I simply couldn't imagine any judge or clerk letting such a phrase pass. Eventually, clueless as I am, I did finally realize this was just another variant on the urban legend Ms Wattenberg documents. —Like Munroe, I'm gonna have to check out her blog, not because I care about baby names, but because of the fascinating nuggets she digs out.

And speaking of digging, I did manage to dig up a 2013 bead to build this index around.

Enjoy.

2014-04-13T21:01:10-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-18:/GlassBeads/2013glassbead_index
2014-04-17T00:00:00-05:00 Heartbleed bug, as explained by xkcd. 17apr2014

Today's page, in addition to documenting one of my favorite kittycat beads, also collects all the sculptural beads together (if you've been wondering where they disappeared to off the glassbeads page.)

And my public service announcement for the day: xkcd explains the heartbleed bug. This is the first major security vulnerability I've heard about in open source software, which strikes me as a pretty good record. (I have no idea how bad such things are in proprietary stuff, since companies are not obliged to disclose their source and have every reason to lie. Not a good combo, imnsho.)

I mean, someone actually came up with a clever name and an eyecatching logo to spread the news—can you imagine any commercial firm going to that effort over a problem with their product? (And this strategy also illustrates a bigger problem, which is indifference: until something awful happens, people in the know, a small minority, will do their best to get the word out, and most folks, absorbed in their day-to-day life, will shrug their shoulders.)

Because the bug is part of a library—shared code that get used by a lot of programs—it's widespread and not the sort of thing where you can say—it's in apache, or X, or whatever. The short answer, of course, is that it's time to change all one's online passwords, particularly those that contain sensitive info (or a lot of work...like this website, frex.)

Which features beads.

2014-04-13T21:00:39-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-17:/GlassBeads/2010snowleopards
2014-04-16T00:00:00-05:00 Today is my sister-in-law's birthday (and she must be terribly tired of my joke about its being so much better the day *after* Apr 15 rather than the day before, or of...) She's collected the blue french beaded flowers I've been giving her into a vase, and today's post documents 2 more for the bou...

Today is my sister-in-law's birthday (and she must be terribly tired of my joke about its being so much better the day after Apr 15 rather than the day before, or of...) She's collected the blue french beaded flowers I've been giving her into a vase, and today's post documents 2 more for the bouquet.

Enjoy.

2014-04-12T18:55:35-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-16:/Wirewrap/2blue_french_beaded_flowers
2014-04-15T00:00:00-05:00 Hi everybody, happy April 15. In the USA, my total sympathies if you're racing to turn in your taxes! (One benefit of being a corp is that I have to turn mine in by Mar 15, and since my accountant does the 1120s and 1040s together, I no longer have this last minute stress. But I have memories of...

Hi everybody, happy April 15. In the USA, my total sympathies if you're racing to turn in your taxes! (One benefit of being a corp is that I have to turn mine in by Mar 15, and since my accountant does the 1120s and 1040s together, I no longer have this last minute stress. But I have memories of racing to the post office after 11pm)

Yesterday I not only posted a really old necklace, but also a really old intro (and, um, the point of the intros is to be topical...whoopsie!) but I can tie it to current events, really! (Sorry about all the bangs, too— spring has sprung, we have sunshine, two inches of snow predicted and it has this uplifting annoying effect on my writing.) See, the thing is, even though it's been years, Ana Mardoll is still doing her careful deconstructions of Twilight; indeed Fred is still doing Left Behind.

But since I never read Twilight, I've been following her critiques of The Dawn Treader. This is my favorite Narnia novel; and I suspect, what many people feel to be the best. There are some criticisms she makes that, while I don't disagree with them (If there was a century of winter, what did the animals eat? And where did Mrs Beaver get a sewing machine, let alone use it, since beavers haven't opposable thumbs?) I don't really feel are worth raising, because fairy tale/magical children's story world building follows different rules. (It's ok to have this sort of logic break down, but it has to be immersive, and interesting, and most of all children have to have agency. Narnia succeeds on those levels, I think.)

But other of her critiques are dead on. There is one section in which the protagonists encounter a mysterious island with these ‘funny little people’, the dufflepuds. At first invisible, they're eventually revealed to be monopods: one legged creatures who must hop from place to place. What were they before? Dwarves, the ruler of the island (a retired star) explains; and nothing as so nice as the ones in Narnia. Lucy, the good, the kind-hearted, thinks they are just so cuuuuute as they are; but they wish to be returned to their earlier form. They are, Mardoll argues, slaves, without even bodily integrity to call their own, and worse, Lucy agrees with their master.

Like so many children, I never really thought about this paternalism. The dufflepuds are presented are stubborn and remarkably stupid and thus deserving of their fate. But one of Mardoll's commenters notes that Lewis wouldn't really have much of a reason to treat them like black slaves, but rather like Irish Catholics. (Coates and his commentariat note that before American slavery really developed race as an identifier religious preference served: and now, now the horrific ways the Catholics and Protestants treated each other make a visceral sense. Oh.)

Mardoll resists this interpretation, but I think the commentator is correct (they evidently live in the UK/Scotland judging from their ’nym). Much as we USAians would like to believe all the world's ills (as well as its successes) are all about us, sometimes, there really are other interpretations. —Regardless, as both reader and author, I really enjoy (and appreciate) these multifarious readings. And I'd hope they'd make me a little bit better of a human being.

Something, as I explain in connection with this necklace, I suspect we could all stand to be.

2014-04-14T21:01:53-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-15:/PageProjects/BEfloralPMCvase
2014-04-14T00:00:00-05:00 reprogrammed kiln (around 10nov08); equally dated musings about _Twilight_... 14apr2014

Still doing spring-cleaning! So the post below I wrote, um, 6 years ago...and the page it links to is of a necklace I started before I knew how to make glass beads (meaning, um, at least six teen years ago...) and photographed at least 8 years ago. But hey, it's a cool necklace, and I'm delighted to finally show it. Plus, I checked out the relevant links, and they all still appear to be live, goodie:)


Needing a low-stress (re) introduction to my torch after (finally!) getting my kiln reprogrammed, complete with two new boro schedules, I decided to make some crisp florals in autumny colors (it is still fall, even if there's been ice and snow on the ground for the last fortnight and more). I even tried a new cane, opaque lemon yellow striped with candy apple (i.e. dark) red and cased in transparent red (which mostly failed to strike, sigh...)

I let these beads cool to see how the new cane was working out, and naturally the one bead that cracked was my fave. Bleh.

But all is not whining! Via a pandagon post, I happened to discover some new posts about the twilight series. I of course was familiar with Cleolinda's trenchant criticisms, and the cartoon that appeared to sum up the first book in 4 efficient panels, but somebody else critiqued the books from a mormon perspective [6 parts] , and I have to say, I enjoyed that take on it as well—those posts have the best use of animated doohickies I've ever encountered on the web. Plus all sorts of comments about Catholics, which as an ex-RCC I found mildly amusing.

And there's a sequel to the excellent cartoon . —So for all you folks mourning the loss of LB Fridays (the movie is entertaining, but not really awful enough) check these out. (See, the thing is, the pern books, particularly the dragonsinger trilogy, and to a lesser extent [mostly because I discovered them too late] Lackey's Herald books were my comfort-poor-pitiful-teenaged-me books. And they have their share of creepinesses as well, what with Lessa getting raped during her dragon's mating flight, not to mention the young teenaged Menolly falling in love with the Masterharper, who's old enough to be her grandfather...McCaffrey wasn't willing to pair them up, but I never bought the romance between her and the bland young man her own age, because, even clueless me could tell she had the hots for her teacher.

So 30 years ago I too would've no doubt eaten this stuff up too; and at least have the pleasure of knowing that f2tY, who is currently reading the series, has also read cleolinda's critiques, and can cite problems, which is more than I'd’ve likely done. I find Cleolinda's comparison of these books to twinkies very apt—childhood yummies that could never live up to your memories of them. That they bring sweet memories is nevertheless to be treasured.)

And speaking of memories to be treasured...

2014-04-13T21:04:12-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-14:/String/leopardskin_butterfly_necklace
2014-04-11T00:00:00-05:00 For many years, photographic technology was optimised for white people. 11apr2014

When I was a wee baby artist just starting out on the art fair circuit, I used to take my own jury slides to save money. I was crappy at it; so then I took a class on studio photography. If I hadn't learnt it already, I was there exposed (heh) to the idea of professional film and processing; it was there I learned transparencies (slides) had greater dynamic range than prints, just as monitors today have greater dynamic range than do prints, though not, of course, as much as the human eye.

Professional film, and, more importantly professional processing give truer colors. (So do matching film to lights—I used a special kind of lamps that were adjusted to 3400 kelvin, as opposed to daylight film, which is balanced for 5000 degrees kelvin—the blue-white light of a noonday sun.) Even so, if you look at old magazine ads (say from the 60s or earlier), the colors look weird—people were sort of brownish and washed out: fuchsia and purples and the like just weren't available then, any more than those pigments were to artists painting in Vermeer's time.

My first (or second, I don't recall) digital camera was terrible about clipping reds, which is to say no matter what I did blue-based reds such as fuchsia rendered as too orange. Even post-processing (in gimp) was no help (though by now, both the program and my skills might have progressed to the point where I could fix this problem...) This sort of messing about with digital images is still necessary if you are serious about your photography.

Needless to say it was even more critical back in the day. In addition to bracketing, and using professional film and processing, I also generally chose fujifilm over kodak, because the fuji was supposed to be better for greens/landscapes, and my work tended to have a lot of those colors, as opposed to kodak, which was preferred by portrait photographers.

And if you've been paying attention, I have twice (in this post alone, I mean) incorporated the assumptions—quite innocently—that these two fascinating articles discuss: the fact that, until quite recently, so far as photography is concerned, ‘people’ equals‘pale orange’ (which is what white people actually are.) In fact there were color balance cards the techs used with circles on them, one half 18% grey, and the other...your typical caucasion skin tones.

So, if you were shooting black folk, their skin would often come out with these green undertones, the result of the film (and particularly the processing) being optimized for light orangey red, which is the complement of green. I'm sure some black photographers recognized that, once again, the systemic racism of western culture had screwed them over; but reading those articles (and man were they a revelation to me—I'd never even thought about this! Whoops!) I couldn't help wondering how many just gave up, convinced the problem was with them, rather than the equipment. —I say this, because when I was young I used to wonder why women's art never seemed to be as good as men's, even though I was aware of sexism.

I just didn't know how bad it was. And so it is with this. Just a casual, and probably mostly thought-less, possibly even unintentional barrier. I applaud the people who overcame it (by shooting b&w, and continuing to complain about disparities still occuring...) and thank them for this fascinating insight.

Alas, I don't know that anyone will necessarily thank me for today's beads...

2014-04-12T07:19:00-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-11:/FridayFugly/daffodilCiMchallenge
2014-04-10T00:00:00-05:00 Right now I'm reading _The Girls of Atomic City_, which tracks the adventures of several women who worked at Oak Ridge, a place that did not exist; they were part of the 80,000 odd people who enriched plutonium for the atom bombs that would eventually be dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They wer...

Right now I'm reading The Girls of Atomic City, which tracks the adventures of several women who worked at Oak Ridge, a place that did not exist; they were part of the 80,000 odd people who enriched plutonium for the atom bombs that would eventually be dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They were the base of the pyramid, the fresh-out-of-school, the country folk, the young, who were attracted by high wages and opportunity.

The book is interesting on several levels. One woman is a college educated chemist—whose degree is in statistics because she wasn't allowed to take her degree in chemistry. As a bench chemist for the project she realizes this is what she wants to do, work in a lab. She still faces coworkers who say to her face that women shouldn't be chemists.

At the other end of the spectrum is the Kattie, the young black wife forced to sleep in a dorm apart from her spouse (despite promises of family living quarters) fed slop with rocks in it that makes her sick, and whose job is clean floors: blacks were not permitted sensitive jobs in rural Tennessee. Being a chemist is so distant she likely cannot even dream of it.

But all of the women in this book—be they chemists or cleaners, cyclotron operators, secretaries or nurses—were paid less than men; exhorted like everyone never to speak of what they did, even to other folks living in the town; continually waiting in line because shortages, even if they had the necessary ration coupons. Freedom of speech and association were severely curtailed, coupled with exhortations to work hard and do one's patriotic duty.(This part read a lot like the histories of communist Russia and China.)

This started with the government simply moving in and forcibly evicting people living in Oak Ridge. The lucky ones got as much as three weeks to move. Unlucky folk got two-three days. People who had been self-sufficient, living off the land, now had to make do with wage-work and the attendant loss of independence, highly prized in Jefferson's day and nearly forgotten by most USians today (excepting amongst all those ‘rural’ people who oddly enough get rather antsy about being rundown as stupid rednecks, can't imaaaaagine why...)

There's still this myth, I guess, that WWII was the ‘good’ war. People have forgotten the rationing, the curtailment of freedoms, let alone the loss of life (and the USA got off easy compared to countries in Europe.) It was hard. People were ready for good times when the war ended...used to conformity, or perhaps unwilling to rock the boat. (Or mebbe the dissenters’ stories were more strongly buried...)

Two other points: the author makes a special effort to point out the contributions of women physicists (one of whom I'd never heard before, despite reading various biographies about physicists during this period—particularly Feinmen, for whom there is a new & quite good graphic version out—and who pointed out the possibility of nuclear fission in 1937, before anyone else had really considered it. But of course she and her observations were sidelined, as women's so often were in the sciences—talking about this book to my amateur astronomer SiL got me an earful about women astronomers who again, were allowed to be computers or work with the bits and pieces, often unpaid...)

The other is that it reminded me again, of the racism pervasive of the time. I never really thought I'd get much into mid 20ca history; but now I find I'm kind of a donkey between two hay bales, TNC's civil war posts (thankfully collected in one spot, hurrah) and all this other stuff!

There is, of course, no way to ever have a one-to-one map of history; like art, one is ever one the verge, I suspect, of ‘getting it’ (or at least, getting to the interesting questions.) But today's post does wrap up the tassel necklace page—it's an older post, cleaned up & indexing.

Enjoy.

2014-04-09T10:42:58-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-10:/String/2005pink_satake_floral_vessel-revised
2014-04-09T00:00:00-05:00 Today's boingboing linkie is Neil Gaiman reading _Blueberry Girl_, illustrated by one his favorite artists, Charles Vess (whose work I like very much). The poem, evidently written for Tori Amos' daughter (and I like Tori Amos' work too;), is delightful. Yeah, I'm wanting out of the `Debbie Downe...

Today's boingboing linkie is Neil Gaiman reading Blueberry Girl, illustrated by one his favorite artists, Charles Vess (whose work I like very much). The poem, evidently written for Tori Amos’ daughter (and I like Tori Amos’ work too;), is delightful. Yeah, I'm wanting out of the ‘Debbie Downer’ mode.

Speaking of blue, today we have a bluebird of happiness...

Enjoy.

2014-04-04T16:14:45-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-09:/String/turquoise-green-white_bird_neck
2014-04-08T00:00:00-05:00 Boingboing has been running _Banu Garu_ for awhile now, but only with the last episode was I actually able to see any of the pages. It's a fascinating look of an american mangaka's history with an animation company, Gainax. The author starts out by noting she suffered the triple whammy of tryin...

Boingboing has been running Banu Garu for awhile now, but only with the last episode was I actually able to see any of the pages. It's a fascinating look of an american mangaka's history with an animation company, Gainax. The author starts out by noting she suffered the triple whammy of trying to publish a 1)anime inspired 2)indie 3)female authored comic in the 80s. There's a reason I'm only now considering attempting this, and it's not just that I had to wait for the technology to catch up.

While sitting on my hands over the comic making, meanwhile, I've been getting back into stringing.

2014-04-04T15:30:47-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-08:/String/ivory_purple_brown_tassel_neck
2014-04-07T00:00:00-05:00 Now that I've got all the plant hangers & 3hole tassel necklaces posted, I'm filling in with the rest of the tassel series, starting with this piece made, or at least photographed, in September of 2010 (in the same sessions as the cobalt 3hole, in fact...) One of the reasons I do this blog is to...

Now that I've got all the plant hangers & 3hole tassel necklaces posted, I'm filling in with the rest of the tassel series, starting with this piece made, or at least photographed, in September of 2010 (in the same sessions as the cobalt 3hole, in fact...)

One of the reasons I do this blog is to document my work—my memory is so flaky I'd otherwise forget it, as for today's piece, which I'd totally lost track of until I started documenting the tassel necklace series. I barely remember stringing it, and have no idea where it is now. While having holey memories is good for letting go of grudges, it can be sort of frustrating for keeping track of one's artistic development: in a very real sense, the blog is an external hard drive of my own head.

Enjoy.

2014-04-04T13:21:45-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-07:/String/brown_floral_multi
2014-04-04T00:00:00-05:00 boingboing linkies---recced history comics, Doctorow on patent trolls, gorgeous coral video. 04apr2014

Today we're doing boingboing linkies:)

Historical comic books includes Larry Gonick, of course, plus some other interesting looking books—to which I'd add March book I of a series of the Civil Rights movement from Congressman John Lewis’ perspective—man wanted to be a preacher, and ended up a politician instead! Not only that, the publisher, Top Shelf, is offering there product line DRM free—kudos to them:) That was our February read for the comics society. March was women's month, so we read Fallout and this interpretation of Marie Curie's life—interspersed with other history—fallout as it were—from her discoveries, is a tour de force. The art is unusual too, being hand-colored cyanographs. A fresh, modern approach to the form.

Cory Doctorow weighs in with one of the many plagues facing modern ‘copy’ culture—but his column, the seven samurai method for defeating patent trolls proposes we find each other on the intertubes, kick in a bit a la indiegogo and kick these arseholes to the curb. I have to stop reading boingboing sometimes because it's so damn depressing, but folks proposing solutions these multifarious problems, which are after all less awful the spectre of a nuclear war/winter (the nightmare of my generation...) make it just a bit simpler.

Daniel Stoupin's video of sea creatures is lovely (if slightly creepy for the internally-skeletinized) with gorgeous photography—brilliant color and crisp detail make the most of the that Hi-def. Alas, as someone with internet access below that of Bulgaria's, it was frustrating to watch because it kept halting.

Finally, though actual article is interesting enough boingboing's commentary—that the experiment worked because a) the land of Oz is less litigious, but also they have full universal health care—was the interesting part So a kid's broken arm is likely not gonna be that big a deal. And actually, f2tE did something very similar—and we didn't even realize ze had a greenstick fracture for a couple of days...

Oh yeah. Necklace. Here ya go.

2014-04-03T09:03:45-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-04:/String/cobalt3hole_floral_tassel_necklace
2014-04-03T00:00:00-05:00 A Crow performer combines a lot of techniques old and new. 03apr2014

Yesterday I discovered this artist via one of the TNC comment threads, and I was pretty impressed—beatboxing, flute-playing, drumming, chanting and rap—five techniques! (Oh, and dancing too.) Makes me look like a piker, the most I've done (in one piece) is three. Plus a really cool outfit, with beadwork:) —If I had to guess, Native beadwork is probably what ignited my interest in beads.

Speaking of beadwork, today's piece features one of my focals, but was strung by another artist, a customer who commissioned the bead. (And tomorrow, with any luck, I'll be posting the necklace that a customer wanted to see, because she commissioned a focal based on a necklace that came out of this piece which was inspired by this earlier piece...

I love this sort of recursion;)

2014-04-02T23:02:36-05:00 tag:www.rejiquar.com,2014-04-03:/String/2010gene3hole